7fcde7 square The Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, SOEST; photo by Dr Steven Businger

rotating photos Aloha!

Welcome to the Department of Oceanography in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. The Department of Oceanography is located on the University of Hawaii’s largest campus (about 20,000 students), overlooking Waikiki and downtown Honolulu.

Inclusive of Cooperating and Affiliate members, more than 70 Graduate Faculty teach and advise graduate students in the Oceanography field of study. The collective research expertise and programs of these faculty provide a broad diversity of potential projects and employment opportunities for students. Department faculty are loosely organized into three Divisions — Physical Oceanography, Marine Geology and Geochemistry (MGGD), and Biological Oceanography; the research activities and publications of the Oceanography Faculty are described on other pages of this web site.

Prospective Students

We encourage applications from talented, motivated students to join our international department. Learn about the programs and application process.

Contact Us

Apollo 11 photo of the ocean planetFor more information, please contact us at:

  • Department of Oceanography
  • 1000 Pope Road, Marine Science Building (MSB) 205
  • School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology
  • University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
  • Honolulu, HI 96822 USA
  • tel: (808) 956-7633 • fax: (808) 956-9225
  • email: ocean@soest.hawaii.edu

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News and Announcements

Ocean Expedition Maps Loihi's Deepest Reaches

Brian Glazer and crew mapped Loihi's deepest reaches more than 16,000 feet below aboard resarch vessel Falkor. This expedition was able to gain more understanding of the Hawaiian Island's youngest volcano and the role submerged volcanoes play in Earth's history.

New Study Reveals Whales as Marine Ecosystem Engineers

Criag Smith co-authored a new journal article published in the Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment that evaluates decades of research on the ecological role of great whales.

Crew Returns With New Data From Loihi Seamont

Brian Glazer and his crew return from their expedition to the Loihi seamount with a plethora of new information about Hawa'i's "new island."

Future Hawaiian Island About to Get Visitors
From June 25th to July 7th Brian Glazer lead an exciting expedition to the Loihi seamont, located near the island of Hawaii. Brian and his team as well as other researchers from the University of Minnasota, IFREMER Centre de Brest, and Woods Hole Oceanographic (WHOI), will survey the seamount's deeper reaches and collect water samples to understand the impact of hydrothermal fluids from Loihi to the Pacific Ocean. Read more

Unusual Sea Creatures Found in the Earth's 'Last Frontier'
Jeff Drazen recently took part in an international expedition that sent an unmanned submarine six miles below the ocean's surfacs to explore the Kermadec Trench near New Zealand. The groundbreaking 30-day expedition provided Jeff and other researchers the opportunity to see amazing places that no one has laid eyes on before. "It's defininately the last fronteir on the plant," said Jeff.

Congratulations Dave Karl and Edward DeLong

Dave Karl and Edward DeLong have been awarded $40 million by the Simons Foundation to lead the Simons Collaboration on Ocean Processes and Ecology (SCOPE), making it the largest private foundation gift UH has ever received. SCOPE aims to further our understanding of the microscopic organisms that inhabit every drop of seawater and how those creatures control the movement and exchange energy and nutrients from the surface waters to the deep sea.

Congratulations Dave Karl
David Karl has been named as the first recipient of The Victor and Peggy Brandstrom Pavel Endowed Chair in Ocean and Earth Science and Technology in SOEST.  The Pavel Endowed Chair has been established with a $2,080,000 gift. Dave plans to use the large gift "to do pioneering research on the micro-organisms that dominate the biomass of the ocean, provide food for most of the food web, harvest solar energy, degrade pollutants, and maintain half the oxygen that we breathe. Our future is tied to the health of the ocean.”

"Ocean in the News" archive articles

 

Pictures from Oceanography Student's and Faculty travels

Adam Jenkins

Photo submitted by Adam Jenkins

 

Giacomo

Photo submitted by Giacomo Giorli

 

Craig Smith

Photo submitted by Craig Smith

 

Tina Lin

Photo submitted by Tina Lin