School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

SOEST in the News: 2012

Jump to: January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December

Marine Biology postcard image

     

Marine Biology graduate program approved

The new Marine Biology PhD and Master of Science Program — the first in Hawai‘i — will be jointly administered by the College of Natural Sciences (CNS) and the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST). Strongly supported by Dean William Ditto of CNS and Dean Brian Taylor of SOEST, the graduate program in Marine Biology will train future leaders in the marine biological sciences. UH Mānoa is uniquely positioned to (continued here…)

Read more about it in the UH System News, UH Mānoa News, and the Pacific Business News, and at the Marine Biology Graduate Program site. Image courtesy of CNS/SOEST.

photo of giant king crab

Dec 14: Polar research: Trouble bares its claws

Cold temperatures have kept crabs out of Antarctic seas for 30 million years. But warm water from the ocean depths is now intruding onto the continental shelf, and seems to be changing the ecological balance. An analysis by Oceanography professor Craig Smith and colleagues suggests that 1.5 million crabs already inhabit Palmer Deep. Huge crabs more than a meter across have invaded the Antarctic abyss, wiped out the local wildlife, and now threaten to ruin delicate ecosystems. “There are no hard-shell-crushing predators in Antarctica,” says Smith. “When these come in they're going to wipe out a whole bunch of endemic species.”

Read more about it in the Nature news feature. Image courtesy of the University of Hawai‘i.

Photo of Kuhio beach, Waikiki

Dec 12: Sea level in Hawai‘i could rise up to a foot by 2050

Scientists are predicting sea level could rise by as much as a foot in the Hawaiian Islands by 2050, and that droughts may become more frequent on leeward sides of the islands. Warmer temperatures will also contribute to the annual bleaching of coral reefs and a reduction in mosquito-free habitat for endangered Hawai‘i birds. The predictions are contained in a report resulting from the collaboration of more than 100 scientists, which was prepared in advance of a public forum in Honolulu on 10 December 2012. Participants included Chip Fletcher, Kevin Hamilton, Jo-Ann Leong, and others from SOEST.

Read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (subscription required). Image courtesy of the G&G Coastal Geology Group.

photo of boulders and cliff

Dec 11: Landslide-driven mega-tsunami impacting Hawai‘i

New evidence of giant waves a thousand feet high called “megatsunami” hitting the Hawaiian Island in the distant past was presented at the 2012 Fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union. Unlike more familiar tsunami from earthquakes, these extraordinary waves strike when the island chain’s massive volcanoes collapse in enormous landslides. This happens about every 100,000 years and is linked to changes in climate, said Oceanography professor Gary McMurtry. Increases in sea level may destabilize a volcanic island’s flanks, and heavier rains could soak its steep slopes, helping trigger landslides.

Read more about it in Our Amazing Planet. Image courtesy of G. McMurtry; click on it to see the full version.

Photo of WWII-era mustard bomb

Dec 07: Mustard bombs’ impact in ocean is studied

Research shows that the US military dumped about 16,000 bombs filled with mustard agent, each weighing 100 pounds, off the coast of Pearl Harbor during World War II. At the time, it was a common method of disposal. Now, decades later, with $3 million in funding from the U.S. Army, scientists at the University of Hawai‘i are investigating whether these weapons could be posing a risk to human health or the marine ecosystem. Margo Edwards, HIGP researcher and CIMES director, is the UH principal investigator for the effort; she said it’s “pretty unlikely” currents or tides would bring any of the mustard agent to shore.

Read more about it, and see video and a Flickr gallery, in the Honolulu Civil Beat; read more about it and see video in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; read about it The Echinoblog (added 12-13-12) and at KHON.com. Image courtesy of the University of Hawai‘i.

Bill Boyce photo of tuna in purse seine

Nov 29: Pacific fishing zones — lifeline for over fished tuna?

A fish modeling study has found that marine zoning in the Pacific Ocean, in combination with other measures, could significantly improve numbers of heavily over fished bigeye tuna and improve local economies. Emeritus Professor John Sibert of the Joint Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR) is one of four scientists who led the study. These marine zones would restrict longline fishing in tuna-spawning areas and manage the use of fish-aggregating devices (e.g. moored or drifting buoys which attract fish) in purse-seine areas.

Read more about it at ScienceDaily, UPI.com, Environmental News Network, Marine Science Today, and UH Mānoa News. Image courtesy of Bill Boyce, boyceimage.com.

photo of John Mahoney

Nov 25: John J. Mahoney

John Joseph Mahoney died on Friday 23 Nov 2012 in Honolulu after a brief illness. John was a professor emeritus and research scientist in the department of Geology & Geophysics, and a lover of the natural world. He is survived by his wife Nancy, his three siblings and their families, and by his three WW II jeeps. His wife was with him when he died. A web memorial for John is being put together by his colleagues, and we would greatly appreciate reminiscences and perspectives from other scientists who knew John or worked with him. Please send contributions to Kathleen Ruttenberg, kcr "at" hawaii dot edu, or Neil Frazer, neil "at" hawaii dot edu. Photographs are welcome. Mahalo.

Image of Indo-Pacific rainfall

Nov 19: Tropical Indo-Pacific climate shifts, more El Niño-like

Climate models predict a slowdown of the Walker circulation with global warming. Atmospheric models, however, have failed to reproduce the slowdown already observed over the last 60 years, casting doubt on their ability to simulate slow climate change. Now a study spearheaded by International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) assistant researcher Hiroki Tokinaga and published in the journal Nature has succeeded in simulating the slowdown and shows that changes in the sea surface temperature pattern across the Indo-Pacific are the cause.

Read more about it in Science Daily, Science Newsline, Raising Islands (added 11-23-12), Summit County Voice, and the UH Manoa News. Image courtesy of Yuji Kashino, RIGC/JAMSTEC.

Photo of flooded street

Nov 13: Groundwater inundation doubles flood predictions

In a study published in Nature Climate Change, Kolja Rotzoll, postdoctoral researcher at the Water Resources Research Center (WRRC), and coastal geology professor Charles Fletcher, SOEST associate dean for academic affairs, showed that in addition to marine inundation, low-lying coastal areas may also be vulnerable to “groundwater inundation,” a factor largely unrecognized in earlier predictions on the effects of sea level rise (SLR). They found that the flooded area in urban Honolulu, including groundwater inundation, is more than twice the area of marine inundation alone. “With groundwater tables near the ground surface, excluding groundwater inundation may underestimate the true threat to coastal communities,” said Rotzoll.

Read more about it and watch the video at KITV.com; read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (subscription required), PhysOrg, Science Daily, Raising Islands (added 11-23-12), Climate Central, Environmental News Network, Raising Islands, EurekAlert!, and the UH Mānoa press release; listen to the interview with Rotzoll on HPR’s “The Conversation” (starts at 6:30 mark). Image courtesy of D. Oda.

SOEST logo

Nov 08 & 14: SOEST on the Radio

• Thursday 08 November: Geology & Geophysics (G&G) specialist Scott Rowland was interviewed about the Mars rover mission “Curiosity” on Hawai‘i Public Radio’s “The Conversation” (the interview starts at about the 6:30 mark). He updated on the Mars rover mission and the findings form some of the geologic analysis: Hawaiian soils are similar to Mars soils.

Wednesday 14 November: Carlie Wiener, COSEE Island Earth program manager, hosted her monthly ocean science talk radio show Hawaii’s Tomorrow (scroll down to the date and listen to the .mp3). COSEE Island Earth, in conjunction with HIMB, is pleased to have featured Mackenzie Manning, biology professor at Kapiolani Community College, Sarah Courbis, operations coordinator for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, and Alexis Rudd, UH Biology Department graduate student. They discussed the important topic of women in science, chronicling their journey and present day issues.

Tiger shark photo

Nov 07: Bites tied to tiger shark migration

While eight shark attacks in Hawai‘i might seem unrelated with different types of sharks apparently involved this year, scientists say the most recent attacks may be part of a larger pattern. The scientists are looking at growing evidence that the attacks may be tied to seasonal migration patterns of tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands to the main Hawaiian Islands. Researcher Kim Holland and assistant researcher Carl G. Meyer of the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) discuss shark migration and the attacks in the video and article, respectively.

Read more about it and watch the video at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (subscription required). Image courtesy of HIMB/SOEST.

Oct 31: Why rainfall projections for S. Pacific are still uncertain

With greenhouse warming, rainfall in the South Pacific islands will depend on two competing effects — an increase due to overall warming and a decrease due to changes in atmospheric water transport — according to a study by an international team of scientists including Matthew Widlansky and Axel Timmermann of the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) and department of Oceanography (Timmermann). These two effects sometimes cancel each other out, resulting in highly uncertain rainfall projections. Results of the study are published in the 28 October 2012 online issue of Nature Climate Change.

Read more about it in Science Daily, Hawaii 24/7, RedOrbit, PhysOrg, and the UH press release. Image courtesy of Digital Typhoon, National Institute of Informatics.

graphic of earthquake energy

Oct 29: Sparse data make tsunami prediction “tricky”

The 7.7-magnitude earthquake that struck off British Columbia on Saturday 27 October — and which prompted a tsunami warning and statewide coastal evacuation — occurred in a spot where quakes like that are rare. The lack of seafloor gauges in the area meant the scientists had to take their best guess as to potential size of any resulting tsunami, and whether to issue an advisory or a warning. “This was a tricky one,” said Gerard Fryer, a geophysicist at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center and HIGP affiliate faculty. “We knew this wasn't going to be a giant tsunami. The question was, ‘Is it going to be big enough to cause flooding and require evacuation?’ It was right at the threshold.”

Read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Image courtesy of Pacific Tsunami Warning Center; click on it to see the full version with caption.

Volcano image

Oct 24: Hawai‘i’s dueling volcanoes share deep link

Published in the November issue of Nature Geoscience, a new paper describes research that finds that a deep connection about 50 miles below Earth’s surface can explain the enigmatic behavior of Mauna Loa and Kīlauea, Earth’s largest and most active volcanoes. Adjacent to each other on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, when one is active the other is quiet. The study also describes observations from 2003 to 2007 in which GPS records showed that each bulged notably due to the pressure of rising magma, and proposes an upper-mantle link that accounts for the inflation (upward bulging) and the eruptive patterns. James Foster, Cecily Wolfe, and Ben Brooks, all of HIGP, are co-authors.

Read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (subscription required), RedOrbit, Honolulu Civil Beat, PhysOrg, Futurity, Big Island Video News, and KITV.com; also, listen to the interview with Foster on HPR’s “The Conversation” (interview is from 36:15 - 45:05; added 10-31-12) and see the SOEST press release PDF. Image courtesy USGS.

photo of students with STOP signs

Oct 19: SOEST works to keep harassment at bay

“We want to get at the root cause and we want to stop sexual harassment before it may begin,” said SOEST Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and professor of geology and geophysics Chip Fletcher. SOEST is taking part in campus-wide sexual harassment and bullying training; the hour-and-a-half class is mandatory for faculty, staff, and students and is expected to take a full year to be completed. He noted that the program has been in the works for a three years, and that while there have been instances of harassment at the university and in SOEST, it is not in reaction to any particular incident.

Read more about it in Ka Leo o Hawai‘i; see also the school’s Gender Equity and Non-discrimination Policy. Image courtesy of levi viloria / Ka Leo O Hawai‘i.

Photo of silversword on Maui

Oct 17: Partnership brings $1.27 million in research grants

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar has announced the funding for projects in the recently established Climate Science Centers (CSC).International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) director Kevin Hamilton is director of the Pacific Islands Climate Science Center (PICSC); he notes that two of the projects are spearheaded by IPRC scientists: Climate Change Research in Support of Hawaiian Ecosystem Management: An Integrated Approach, led by Oliver Elison Timm, and 21st Century High-Resolution Climate Projections for Guam and American Samoa, led by Yuqing Wang.

The Pacific Islands Climate Science Center Inaugural Lecture “Navigating Change: Climate Science and Collaboration in the Pacific” with Loyal Mehrhoff, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and Deanna Spooner, Pacific Islands Climate Change Cooperative, was held on Friday 26 October 2012 from 1:30–3pm in Kuykendall Auditorium on the UH Mānoa campus. Download the flyer PDF for details.

Read more about it Hawaii 24/7, Maui Now, and Big Island Video News; see also the IPRC press release PDF. Image courtesy of Markus Speidel.

HNEI logo graphic

Oct 15: HNEI plans test of hydrogen fuel source

The Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) has plans for a project that will demonstrate the use of hydrogen as a potential energy storage technology with the side benefit of providing hydrogen for fuel cells to power one of the public buses on the Big Island. HNEI has a mandate to develop alternatives to imported fossil fuels for electricity and transportation and has established a major hydrogen fuel research and development program. The Big Island project, which includes collaboration with Hawaii Electric Light Co., and Puna Geothermal Venture, is one of these initiatives.

Read more about it at Fuel-Cell Today and in the Hawaii Tribune-Herald (added 01-10-13), as well as Pacific Business News and Hydrogen Fuel News. Image courtesy HNEI/SOEST.

photo of diseased coral

Oct 15: Kaua‘i rice coral under attack

Researchers at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) have confirmed that a disease is killing rice coral in Hanalei Bay on Kaua‘i’s north shore at an alarming rate. They are working to determine the cause and are trying different ways to stop it. Pictures show black rings spreading through healthy orange tissue, leaving behind bleached dead areas. “We know it’s an outbreak, we know it’s a problem, we know it’s killing corals and now we’re working to see what is causing the problem here,” said coral expert Greta Aeby. Visit Eyes of the Reef for information on how you can be part of the team spotting diseased coral and other threats to Hawai‘i’s reefs.

Read more about it and watch the video at Hawaii News Now; read more about it in USGS Science Features (added 12-26-12), the LA Times, and the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Image courtesy of T. Lilley.

COSEE-IE logo

Oct 15: COSEE (Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence) Island Earth new web site online

COSEE (Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence) Island Earth is pleased to announce the release of their new website at www.cosee-ie.net! Information available includes news about COSEE-IE programs and upcoming events, outreach resources and ocean science materials, details about programs and partners, and radio show podcasts for download from the All Things Marine program.

Photo of clouds over O'ahu

Oct 12: Documenting the decrease in Hawai‘i’s trade winds

Meteorologists Jessica A. Garza, Pao-Shin Chu, Chase Norton, and Thomas Schroeder report a decrease in the frequency of northeast trade winds and an increase in eastern trade winds over the past nearly four decades, in a recent study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research. For example, northeast trade wind days as measured at Honolulu International Airport occurred 291 days per year in the mid-1970s, but now only occur 210 days per year. Chu explained that because trades are the primary source of moisture for rain, a dramatic reduction could fundamentally change Hawai‘i’s overall climate.

Listen to the interview with Pao-Shin Chu on HPR’s “The Conversation” recorded on 10-18-12; interview starts at about 37:00. Read more about it and watch the video at Hawaii News Now; read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (subscription required), The Garden Island (added 10-24-12), Maui Time, The Honolulu Civil Beat, Hawaii 24/7 Raising Islands, Science Daily, PhysOrg, RedOrbit, and in the SOEST press release PDF. Image courtesy of Chris Ostrander/SOEST.

photo of sensor in tidepool

Oct 12: Examining ecosystem response to ocean acidification

The OMEGAS (Ocean Margin Ecosystems Group for Acidification Studies) Consortium has received a grant of nearly $1.1 million to analyze the ecological and biological responses of marine organisms to ocean acidification by conducting field and laboratory experiments across a network of 10 near-shore ocean acidification monitoring sites spanning 1400 km of California coastline. Oceanography professor Margaret McManus will be part of the team focusing on the mussel Mytilus californianus, a widespread component of the rocky intertidal zone ecosystem whose larvae are negatively affected by elevated levels of CO2 in the ocean water.

Read more about it at UH Mānoa News. Image courtesy of the OMEAGAS Consortium.

photo of Tropical Cyclone 01A_24 May 2001

Oct 09: Intensified Arabian Sea tropical storms

The tropical cyclones in the Arabian Sea during the pre-monsoon season (May–June) have intensified since 1997 compared to 1979–1997. This is the result of decreased vertical wind shear due to a 15-day on average earlier occurrence of tropical cyclones and an earlier monsoon onset, according to a study spearheaded by Bin Wang, chair of the Department of Meteorology and researcher at the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC), and published in “Brief Communications Arising” in the 20 September 2012 issue of Nature.

Read more about it in Science Daily and in the IPRC press release PDF. Image courtesy of NOAA.

Artist rendering of dust disk

Oct 08: Planets made easy: the cosmic glue that binds us all

Chondrules, millimeter-sized spherical blobs found in many meteorites, are thought to have melted from dust balls that then cooled and crystallized. They likely formed within our solar system’s first four million years, even before the sun had begun life as a hydrogen-burning star. They might seem interesting only as 4.5 billion year-old throw-backs to our solar system’s earliest beginnings but, in fact, were likely responsible for triggering terrestrial planet formation. Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) cosmochemist Gary Huss says chondrule formation would appear to be a required step to form planetary bodies of more than a meter in size.

Read more about it in Forbes. Image courtesy of NASA Goddard Photo and Video; click on it to see the original image and description.

C-MORE Hale photo (c) 2011, David Franzen.

Oct 07: C-MORE Hale in Green Building & Design Magazine

C-MORE Hale, home on the UH Mānoa campus of the Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) and the first LEED Platinum laboratory facility in the state of Hawai‘i, is profiled in the latest issue of Green Building & Design Magazine.

Photo of Pisces V

Oct 04: HURL featured on National Geographic’s “Alien Deep”

The Hawai‘i Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) and its submersibles Pisces IV and Pisces V, submersible pilot Terry Kerby, and the support ship Ka‘imikai-o-Kanaloa, are featured in this exciting and informative new five-part series hosted by Dr Robert Ballard, the famed explorer who found the Titanic in her final resting place.

In the image at left, Pisces V explores a submarine wreck on National Geographic’s “Alien Deep.” Click on the image to see a video highlight; image courtesy National Geographic.

PacIOOS Voyager logo

Oct 02: PacIOOS Voyager Released for all U.S. affiliated Pacific Islands

The Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) is excited to announce that ocean enthusiasts, researchers, resource managers, and the general public now have a new interactive online mapping platform with the release of "Voyager." Voyager allows ocean users to dynamically combine, view, download, and query thousands of data layers across the Pacific for free. This powerful, yet easy-to-use interface serves as a decision-making portal at all levels — from the individual planning a fishing trip to a region facilitating large-scale planning efforts.

To learn more about PacIOOS Voyager please download the press release PDF, visit the Voyager web site, and read the article in The Hawaii Reporter.

photo of Martian weather

Sep 30: Martian weather reports reveal extreme pressure swings

The newest Mars rover, Curiosity, is sending back remarkable weather observations from the Martian surface. “The exciting new result from Curiosity is a regular and truly enormous swing in atmospheric pressure through each day. Measurements on Earth show a daily swing in pressure of only about one-tenth of 1% of the mean pressure, whereas Curiosity is measuring swings of almost 10% of the daily average pressure,” says meteorologist and International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) director Kevin Hamilton, a pioneer in the area of computer modeling of the Martian atmosphere. “These results confirm a theoretical prediction I made years ago that the daily cycle on Mars could be amplified by a global resonance of the atmosphere.”

Read more about it at The Garden Isle and UH Mānoa News. Image courtesy of NASA/JPL.

photo of opihi

Sep 28: Researchers make groundbreaking ‘opihi discovery

Researchers just back from the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument have made a discovery that could help marine managers devise strategies to help ‘opihi thrive: females live higher on rocky shores than do males. Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) postdoctoral scholar Chris Bird noted, “So what we’re trying to do is demonstrate how the ‘opihi populations in the main islands that are harvested are different than they are in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.” Cultural Researcher Shauna Kehaunani Springer noted the importance of understanding spawning timing. “So, getting an understanding of when spawning times are will help you to make better management decisions on when to harvest ‘opihi.“

Read more about it at and see the video at Hawaii News Now. Image courtesy of B. Bangerter.

HSFL logo graphic

Sep 26: UH satellite program moves toward liftoff

The work of UH-system students, engineers, and faculty of the Hawai‘i Space Flight Laboratory (HSFL) is highlighted in the Honolulu Star Advertiser (subscription required). The HSFL team is preparing for the first launch of its low-Earth-orbit HiakaSat satellite project a year from now from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kaua‘i. HiakaSat mission goals include the collection of thermal hyperspectral images that HIGP Specialist and HSFL Director, Luke Flynn, says “will provide data on global warming, ocean temperatures, coral bleaching, volcanoes, and a whole host of issues that affect Hawai‘i and the rest of the world.”

Read more about it in the Honolulu Star Advertiser (subscription required). Image courtesy of HSFL.

photo of tsunami debris

Sep 21: NOAA confirms storage bin is first piece of Japan tsunami debris found off Hawai‘i

A large, barnacle-encrusted blue bin used for transporting seafood was spotted floating off Waimanalo, on the southeast coast of O‘ahu, by Makai Ocean Engineering staff and was retrieved by the Hawai‘i Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL). Senior researcher Nikolai Maximenko of the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC), an ocean currents expert who is studying the trajectory of the tsunami debris, said the 4-by-4-foot bin’s arrival is consistent with his predictions for when the first pieces would get to Hawai‘i. For the latest debris field data, visit IPRC’s Tsunami Debris Project.

Read more about it and see the video at Hawaii News Now (incl. interview with Terry Kerby of HURL); read more about it in the Washington Post and Urban Honolulu. Image courtesy of Hawaii News Now.

SOEST logo

Sep 14 & 19: SOEST on the Radio

Wednesday 19 September: Carlie Wiener, COSEE Island Earth program manager, hosted her monthly ocean science talk radio show “All Things Marine” (scroll down to the date for the archive of the broadcast). The COSEE Island Earth program, in conjunction with HIMB, is pleased to have included featured guests Lou Herman, Adam Pack, and Whitlow Au talking about humpback whales and some fascinating new research around their songs and mate choices.

• September 14 Friday : Geology & Geophysics (G&G) specialist Scott Rowland was interviewed about the Mars rover mission Curiosity on Hawai‘i Public Radio’s “The Conversation” (interview starts at ~36:50).

Photo of monsoon

Sep 10: Climate change and South Asian summer monsoon

In a recent review paper in Nature Climate Change, researcher Andrew Turner of the University of Reading and senior researcher H. Annamalai of the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) write that they are beginning to understand more about the systems driving the South Asia monsoon — critical to sustaining plants, animals, and 1.6 billion people on the subcontinent — and that they hope to improve their projections in years to come. Turner is interviewed about some of the implications of their analysis, and about the possible future impacts of climate change on the monsoon, in The New York Times’“Green Blog.”

Read more about it The New York Times “Green Blog”; see also the abstract of the paper. Image courtesy of Gisela Speidel, IPRC.

photo of coral

Aug 30: Coral host inflexibility leads to higher stress resistance

In a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, scientists at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) and colleagues report a discovery that challenges a major theory in the field of coral reef ecology. The general assumption has been that the more flexible as to which species of symbiotic single-celled algae (Symbiodinium) corals are able to host, the greater their ability survive environmental stress. Instead, researchers found that the more flexible corals are less resilient when challenged by environment disturbances. “This is exactly the opposite of what we expected,” said Hollie Putnam, lead author of the study.

Read more about it at NSF’s Environmental Biology Discoveries, Hawaii Reporter (added 09-04-12), RedOrbit, PhysOrg, and examiner.org (with video about coral bleaching); listen to an interview with Putnam on HPR’s “The Conversation” (starts at ~6m30s) and an interview with professor Ruth Gates on Radio Australia (link added 09-11-12); read the SOEST press release (PDF). Image courtesy of Hollie Putnam, SOEST.

2012 RAMP image

Aug 28: 2012 RAMP cruise returns to Honolulu from NWHI

Researchers have returned from the 2012 RAMP (Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program) expedition to the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). On the 24-day research cruise scientists observed that schools of ulua and other larger creatures are plentiful in the waters of the monument; they see them as positive signs of ecosystem health in one of the largest protected areas in the world. While at sea, they also shared their stories of exploration and discovery on their expedition log and served as a long distance classroom for ten schools across the state.

Read more about it at UH System News (added 09-04-12), KHON2 and on the expedition log; listen to Carlie Wiener, COSEE Island Earth program manager, and guests on the episode of her monthly radio show that was broadcast LIVE on Wednesday 15 August from R/V Hiialakai as they visited Kure Atoll. Image courtesy of Jason Helyer/NOAA.

Photo of introduced ta'ape

Aug 25: Invasive ta‘ape maintains diversity by fast invasion

Biological invasions with known histories are rare, especially in the sea. Fifty-five years ago, the Hawai‘i Division of Fish and Game [now Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR)] undertook an ambitious fishery-enhancement program by releasing 12 species of snappers and groupers in the Hawaiian Islands. To gain a better understanding of what factors lead to the success of invasive species, researchers from the Hawi‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) — Michelle Gaither, Robert Toonen, and Brian Bowen — used genetic tools to study the spread of these species and to look for changes in genetic diversity following introduction.

Read more about it in PhysOrg, Raising Islands, and RedOrbit; see also the abstract of the paper. Image courtesy of Keoki Stender.

photo of cattle on Maui

Aug 19: Meteorologists fear Hawai‘i drought may worsen

Pao-Shin Chu, a professor of Meteorology and the Hawai‘i State Climatologist, said there is a good chance an El Niño may develop over the next couple months. This would mean a strong chance for a dry winter and spring, normally Hawai‘i’s wet season. “I’m not too worried about what's happening now. This is the summer and we don't expect much rain,” he said. “But I worry about what happens in the future. If El Niño develops — it’s now in an early stage — then this current drought may persist into the next rainy season and that would be very, very bad.” The U.S. Drought Report shows more than 80% of Hawai‘i is experiencing some level of drought, ranging from abnormally dry to extreme, especially in the eastern half of the state.

On a related topic, in the June 2012 edition of JGR Atmosphere, Jessica A. Garza, Pao-Shin Chu, Chase W. Norton, and Thomas A. Schroeder of the department of Meteorology also report a downward trend in northeast trade wind frequency since 1973.

Read more about the drought in Honolulu Civil Beat. Image courtesy of Nathan Eagle/Honolulu Civil Beat.

Video still of what may be pieces of plane

Aug 19: Researchers may have found parts of Earhart’s plane

A review of high-definition underwater video footage taken in July with ROVs working from R/V Ka‘imikai-O-Kanaloa has revealed a scattering of man-made objects on the reef slope off the west end of Nikumaroro atoll in the southwestern Pacific republic of Kiribati, according to Ric Gillespie, executive director of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR). “We had, of course, hoped to see large pieces of aircraft wreckage but as soon as we saw the severe underwater environment at Nikumaroro we knew that we would be looking for debris from an airplane that had been torn to pieces 75 years ago,” Gillespie said.

Read more about it and see the video at Hawaii New Now, CNN’s “This Just In”, and Discovery News; read about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Image courtesy of Hawaii News Now.

Photo of Coconut Island

Aug 17: HIMB to house state-of-the-art solar energy project

The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa has signed a power purchasing agreement (PPA) with SolarCity to provide renewable solar energy to the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) on Moku o Lo‘e (Coconut Island) for the next 20 years. The university’s participation was enabled by financial support from the Center for a Sustainable Future. Instrumental in bringing this agreement to a close was Stephen Meder, UH Mānoa Interim Associate Vice Chancellor for Physical, Environmental and Long Range Planning, director of UH Sea Grant’s Center for Smart Building and Community Design (CSBCD), and professor of architecture.

Read more about it at NBCNews.com (added 08-31-12) and the UH Mānoa News, Image courtesy of HIMB.

Photo of Diatom Hemiaulus spp. (namely Bob)

Aug 12: “Occupy ALOHA 2012: A tribute to Bob Dylan”

UH Mānoa oceanography graduate student Shimi Rii was a cruise participant on the Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE)’s first major HOE-DYLAN cruise earlier this summer to Station ALOHA. As part of her professional development program, she has posted a “tribute to Bob Dylan and the complexities of algal blooms”on the Student Voices Blog at Nature.com.

RAMP image

Aug 09: 2012 RAMP Expedition to Northwest Hawaiian Islands

Join a team of researchers as they report on the 2012 RAMP (Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program) expedition to the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands for a three and a half week research cruise. They will be sharing their stories of exploration and discovery from this remote area in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. You can follow along by reading the cruise log and by liking the Monuments’s Facebook page.

UPDATE: Listen to Carlie Wiener, COSEE Island Earth program manager, on her monthly show on “Hawai‘i’s Tomorrow” that was broadcast LIVE on Wednesday 15 August from R/V Hiialakai as the RAMP Expedition visits Kure Atoll in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

photo of Curiosity rover landing

Aug 07: Curiosity’s landing launches research for UH scientist

For someone with such an immense amount of work ahead, G&G specialist Scott Rowland — one of several geologists selected to be part of an elite camera team that will help to analyze data received from the rover — could hardly have been happier. He and about 20 faculty, including HIGP director Peter Mouginis-Mark, students and community members, watched via the live feed of NASA rover Curiosity’s successful landing on the surface of Mars on Sunday night. Rowland soon leaves for Pasadena, where he will spend three months with the rest of the team establishing procedures for analyzing the information Curiosity transmits.

See the video at Hawaii News Now; read about it at Honolulu Star-Advertiser (login required), The Garden Island, and The Republic; listen to an interview with Scott Rowland on Hawaii Public Radio’s “The Conversation” (starts at ~38:30). More background is available at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (login required) including comments by Pete Mouginis-Mark. Image courtesy of NASA / JPL.

SOEST logo

Aug 02: Congratulations!

• The Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS) has announced the recipients of the 2011 Innovation Awards. Among them is HIGP Researcher/Associate Director Shiv Sharma, coauthor on the paper, "Large-Area Standoff Planetary Raman Measurements Using a Novel Spatial Heterodyne Fourier Transform Raman Spectrometer" with S. Michael Angel and Nathaniel R. Gomer (University of South Carolina) and J. Chance Carter (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory). Details on the HIGP home page.

• The American Geophysical Union (AGU) has announced that HIGP Affiliate Faculty and AGU Fellow Michael Fuller, senior researcher in paleomagnetism and geomagnetism. will be the next recipient of the 2012 John Adam Fleming Medal. Details on the HIGP home page.

• The Geological Society of America (GSA) has named Todd Bianco the 2012–2013 GSA-USGS Congressional Science Fellow. Bianco completed his MS (2004) and PhD (2009) in Geology and Geophysics (G&G) here.

• Congratulations to the School of Architecture student design team for being one of two teams winning a national design competition! Students of Steve Meder, architecture professor and director of UH Sea Grant’s Center for Smart Building and Community Design (CSBCD), they created an affordable, adaptable, and accessible home elevated to 8'-0" above grade allowing the space below the home to serve as a carport.

• Congratulations to former HIMB graduate student and now NSF post-doctoral fellow at Brown University, Laura Kloepper for winning first prize for the best student paper for her talk Animal BioAcoustics at the Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Societies of China and America in Hong Kong! See the Summer 2012 issue of Echoes (PDF) from the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) for more information.

Photo of Acropora tenuis coral releasing sperm

Jul 29: Frozen eggs and sperm cells offer a lifeline for coral

Mary Hagedorn, a visiting scientist and affiliate faculty member at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) and researcher at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI), is building what is essentially a sperm bank for the world’s corals. She hopes her collection—gathered in recent years from Hawai‘i, the Caribbean, and Australia—could be used to restore and even rebuild damaged reefs. In addition to gametes, the collection has embryonic cells, some of which may have the potential to grow into adult corals.

Read more about it in The New York Times and The Sydney Morning Herald. Image courtesy of A. Heyward, Australian Institute of Marine Science.

Photo of array recovery

Jul 25: Scientists confirm existence of marine vitamin “deserts”

Using a newly developed analytical technique, a team of researchers from the US and Mexico was the first to report long-hypothesized vitamin B deficient zones in the ocean. “An important result of our study is that the concentrations of the five major B vitamins vary independently and appear to have different sources and sink,’ said co-author David Karl, Oceanography professor and C-MORE director. “This could lead to complex interactions among populations of microbes, from symbiosis to intense competition.”

Read more about it at in the International Business Times, UH News, EurekAlert!, and in the SOEST press release PDF; see the paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Image courtesy of Paul Lethaby, SOEST.

SOEST logo

Jul 17, 12, & 26: SOEST on the Radio

Tuesday 26 July: Denise Eby Konan, director of the UH Sea Grant Center for Sustainable Coastal Tourism (SCT) and dean of the College of Social Sciences (CSS) was interviewed about using deep ocean water in air conditioning systems on Hawaii Public Radio’s “The Conversation” (starts at ~37:00).

• Monday 23 July: Carlie Wiener, COSEE Island Earth and the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB), talked to Scott Godwin and Daniel Wagner from the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, and Judith Lemus and Megan Onuma from COSEE Island Earth and HIMB on her monthly show on “Hawai‘i’s Tomorrow” (scroll to Mon 23 Jul 2012 5:59 PM for the mp3).

Tuesday 17 July: Geology & Geophysics (G&G) specialist Scott Rowland talked about the upcoming Mars rover mission “Curiosity” — scheduled to land in Gale Crater on 08-06-12 — on Hawaii Public Radio’s “The Conversation” (starts at ~38:30).

photo of sea star

Jul 23: Researchers discover fastest known marine speciation

In a new study, an international team of researchers discovered that two species of sea stars evolved only 6,000 years ago, during a period of rapid environmental alteration. Said lead investigator and HIMB postdoctoral researcher Jonathan Puritz, “This rate of speciation is nearly a hundred times faster than we normally see in the ocean, and to have it coupled with such a drastic change in life history is really spectacular. It seems like evolution in life history traits may be a particularly fast pathway to speciation.”

Read more about it at PhysOrg, LiveScience, and UPI. Image courtesy of Jonathan. Puritz, SOEST.

Photo of Kina, a false killer whale

Jul 17: Whales may learn to cope with undersea noise

Paul Nachtigall, director of the Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB), and colleagues report a false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) learned to adjust her hearing sensitivity when trained to expect a loud sound. In the future, the team plans to expand the research to other species in captivity and ultimately to animals in the wild. “We have a problem in the world,” Nachtigall said of marine man-made noise. “And we think the animals can learn this response very rapidly.”

Read more about it in The New York TImes, UH News (added 07-20-12), The Age, and RedOrbit; other links are at the archived SOEST new item. Image courtesy of Aude Pacini.

photo of crew in chef's hats

Jul 09: Crew selected for Mars food mission

The Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) is part of a NASA study to determine the best way to keep astronauts healthy and happy in space. Researchers from UH Mānoa and Cornell University have selected six people out of hundreds of applicants for a simulated Mars mission to test new food and food preparation strategies for multiple-year missions. Kim Binsted, UH Mānoa associate professor of information and computer sciences (ICS) and G&G graduate student, is a member of the research team.

Read more about and watch a video at Big Island Video News; read about it in UH System News, Medical Daily, “The Salt” (NPR blog), and KPUA. Image courtesy of Cornell University.

Photo of Amelia Earhart

Jul 02: K-O-K assists in investigation of Earhart disappearance

Monday 02 July 2012 marks the 75th anniversary of famed aviator Amelia Earhart’s disappearance, and the Research Vessel Ka‘imikai-O-Kanaloa could soon help The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) to solve the enduring mystery. John Smith, science director for the Hawai‘i Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL), will go with the TIGHAR team to assist in the undersea mapping, said HURL director John Wiltshire. The expedition and its findings will filmed by a crew from Discovery Channel for a documentary to air in August.

UPDATE 08-21-12: Upon examination of high-resolution video, researcher now think they may have found parts of Earhart’s plane in the waters off Nikumaroro atoll in the Republic of Kiribati. See the links on the SOEST home page news item for details.

UPDATE 07-25-12: See “Searchers fail to find evidence of aviator's fate” at The Guardian.

Watch the video about the cruise at KITV.com, which includes comments by Ross Barnes, UH Marine Center Port Operations Manager; read about it and watch the video at Hawaii News Now, KHON2, and MSNBC; read more about it in the Washington Post, the Christian Science Monitor, TechNews, and the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Image courtesy of Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

photo of monsoon rain

Jun 25: Climate change and the South Asian summer monsoon

The vagaries of South Asian summer monsoon rainfall impact the lives of more than one billion people. Based on an extensive review of recent research, senior researcher H. Annamalai of the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) and post-doctoral scholar A.G. Turner of the University of Reading in the UK, conclude that with continued rise in CO2 the region can expect generally more rainfall. Regional projections for devastating droughts and floods, however, are still beyond the reach of current climate models. Their review is in the 24 June 2012 online edition of Nature Climate Change.

Read more about it in Science Daily. Image courtesy of G. Speidel, IPRC/SOEST.

handbook cover image

Jun 20: Free Community Hazard Preparedness Fair

Saturday 23 June • 10 am to 2 pm • Town Center of Mililani. Download the flyer PDF.
Are you prepared for the next natural hazard? Stop by for your FREE copy of the the Homeowner’s Handbook to Prepare for Natural Hazards. Also, Dennis Hwang, UH Sea Grant Coastal Hazard Mitigation Specialist, appeared on KHON2 this Friday at 7:50 am to talk more about hazard preparedness.

Read more about it at The Garden Island. Image courtesy of UH Sea Grant.

aquaponics image

Jun 18: UH Aquaculture outreach program is online

In response to the growing need for sustainable aquaculture, the UH Mānoa Aquaculture Program has launched a new online community outreach program called “ATOLL: Aquaculture Training and Online Learning”; it is the brainchild of program coordinator Tetsuzan Benny Ron. Supported by grants from NOAA, the team includes dedicated expert faculty from the Mānoa campus, including UH Sea Grant, as well as local farmers and representatives from the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture (HDOA) and University of Oregon Sea Grant.

Read more about it at KITV.com and UH Mānoa News. Image courtesy of Natalie Cash, Farm Manager, Olomana Gardens.

Kuhio Beach loss photo

Jun 18: Beach erosion on the radio

Download the MP3 of the Radio New Zealand International interview with Chip Fletcher, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, head of the Coastal Geology Group (CGG), and professor of Geology & Geophysics (G&G), as he talks about the decade-long study that examined erosion in Hawai‘i (his interview starts at 17:20).

Debris flow graphic

Jun 08: Officials worry about creatures on tsunami dock

Scientific computer programmer Jan Hafner of the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) is tracking the 1.5 million tons of tsunami debris likely floating across the Pacific from the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Researchers and officials are concerned about the plant and animal life native to the western Pacific, but not found in the East, that is hitching rides on the floating material. For example, hundreds of millions of individual organisms, including a tiny species of crab, a species of algae, and a species of starfish were clinging to a boxcar-sized dock, swept from the port of Misawa, that recently came ashore in Oregon.

Read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser here, here, and here, in the Seattle Times (which focuses on hazardous waste, added 06-21-12), and in USA Today, which has an interactive graphic of the projected debris field. For the latest data, visit the Tsunami Debris Project. Image courtesy of USA Today.

HIMB logo

Jun 05: Marine science on the radio

Listen to the podcast of Carlie Wiener, COSEE-IE Program Manager, on Hawaii’s Tomorrow on 760 AM, recorded on Tuesday 05 June 2012 afternoon. Featured guests include Robert Toonen, associate researcher at HIMB; Charles Littnan, lead scientist for NOAA Fisheries Monk Seal Research Program; and Elia Herman, State co-manager for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary.

Listen to the podcast at Hawai‘i’s Tomorrow (click on June 5, 2012 5:59 PM).

Climate change workshop image

May 29: “Community Partnerships for Climate Change Education and Adaptation: May Day”

Chip Fletcher, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, head of the Coastal Geology Group (CGG), and professor of Geology & Geophysics (G&G), recently participated in a climate change workshop in American Sāmoa hosted by the Pacific Islands Climate Education Partnership (PCEP). The workshop aimed to raise awareness about climate issues in the Pacific, increase knowledge of collective work around climate change in American Sāmoa, and establish a network of partners and expertise in the field to connect with the PCEP partnership.

Read more about it in the Saipan Tribune. Image courtesy of Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL).

Image of Hurricane Iniki

May 29: Fewer hurricanes predicted for central Pacific

The number of hurricanes predicted for the central Pacific Ocean, including Hawaii, is down this year, but preparations are up under new building standards adopted by the state. Dennis Hwang, UH Sea Grant College Program’s Coastal Hazard Mitigation Specialist, highlighting the need for hurricane preparedness as we near the start of hurricane season (01 June thru 30 November). The second edition of the Homeowner’s Handbook to Prepare for Natural Hazards has been released and is available free as a hard copy at the UH Sea Grant office on the Mānoa campus, and as a PDF download from the online bookstore.

Read more about it and watch the video report at Hawaii News Now, and read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (subscription required). Visit the UH Sea Grant College Program for more information about disaster preparedness and a schedule of the upcoming workshops. Image courtesy of NOAA.

SOEST logo

May 20: Congratulations!

  • Bin Wang, professor and chairman of the Department of Meteorology and faculty member with the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC), has been selected the 2011–12 Scientist of the Year by the Honolulu Chapter of the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS) Foundation. Read more about it here.
  • Shimi Rii, Department of Oceanography PhD student, has won an ARCS Scholar award.
HIMB logo

May 17: HIMB on the radio

COSEE program manager Carlie Wiener hosted a radio show about marine research in the Hawaiian Islands on Wednesday 16 May, and the podcast is online. Featured guests included Researcher Brian Bowen and Assistant Researcher Marc Lammers from HIMB, who were scheduled to discuss their exciting research in the Main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. PhD candidates and Hawaiian Islands Symposium student presentation winner and runner up Jonathan Whitney and Nyssa Silberger were scheduled to discuss the marine science field from a student perspective. Brenda Asuncion and Kanani Frasier were to share their work designing and distributing the Hanalei Moon Calendar.

Listen to the podcast at Hawai‘i’s Tomorrow (click on May 16, 2012 5:59 PM) or listen to it at Christie Wilcox's “Science Sushi” blog.

Photo of Kina, a false killer whale

May 16: False killer whales adjust their hearing sensitivity

At the Acoustics 2012 meeting, Paul Nachtigall, director of the Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) and Alexander Ya Supin, of the Russian Academy of Sciences, report on the ability of a false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) to adjust her hearing sensitivity when trained to expect a loud noise. Previous research suggested that they can “dull” their hearing before generating very loud outgoing echolocation clicks. “We think — based on much of our echolocation work — that it is much more than a simple reflex,” Nachtigall says.

Read more about it and see the video at the BBC; read more about it in Science Daily and a Scientific American podcast. Image courtesy of HIMB.

Photo of beach erosion

May 08: 70% of beaches eroding on Kaua‘i, Maui, and O‘ahu

An assessment of coastal change over the past century has found 70% of beaches on the islands of Kaua‘i, O‘ahu, and Maui are undergoing long-term erosion, according to a US Geological Survey (USGS) / SOEST report released on 05-07-12. “A better understanding of historical shoreline change and human responses to erosion may improve our ability to avoid erosion hazards in the future,” said Chip Fletcher, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, head of the Coastal Geology Group (CGG), professor of Geology & Geophysics (G&G), and lead scientist on the decade-long study that examined more than 150 miles of Hawai‘i coastline.

Read more about it and watch the video report at KITV4 and Hawaii News Now; listen to the interview with Chip Fletcher on HPR’s “The Conversation” (starts at ~37min) and download the Radio New Zealand International podcast MP3 (starts at 17:20; added 06-12-12); read about it in The New York Times (added 05-21-12), the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (subscription), USGS Newsroom, Maui News, LiveScience, and UH System News. See also the SOEST press release PDF. Image courtesy of USGS; click on it to see a photo gallery at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

graphic of R/V Kilo Moana detecting tsunami

May 07: Improving tsunami warning using commercial ships

Highly sensitive geodetic GPS equipment onboard R/V Kilo Moana detected the tsunami generated by the February 2010 magnitude 8.8 earthquake in Chile even though it was only 9.4 cm high as it passed under the ship, as reported in a paper in Geophysical Research Letters by lead author James Foster and co-authors Ben Brooks, Glenn Carter, and Mark Merrifield (all of SOEST) and Dailin Wang of NOAA’s Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC). A proposed system of similar GPS units installed on commercial ships could, as Foster notes, “improve our detection and predictions of tsunamis — saving lives and money.”

Read more about it and watch the video report at KHON2 and KITV4; read about it at Raising Islands, Hawaii 24/7, Phys.org, Hawaii Reporter, and UH System News. See also the SOEST press release PDF. Image courtesy of J. Foster / SOEST; click on it to see the full version.

Photo of teacher using microscope

May 04: Teacher talks about “Microscopes” program

On the Friday 04 May edition of Hawaii Public Radio’s “The ConversationJenny Kuwahara, an 8th grade science teacher at Mililani Middle School and president-elect of the Hawai‘i Science Teachers Association, talks about the Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE)’s Microscopes in Middle Schools program and the value of hands-on experience in science education. Ms Kuwahara’s segment of the program starts at about the 38 minute mark.

Listen to the interview at HPR’s The Conversation. Image courtesy of C-MORE.

Photo of HIGP professor Patty Fryer

May 02: Trench dive is “thrill” of professor’s career

Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) professor Patty Fryer used her knowledge as “one of the world’s, if not the world’s, leading expert of the Mariana Trench” to help film director James Cameron with his solo dive to the site last month. Fryer advised Cameron on what samples to collect and provided detailed topographical maps. ”This was really a culmination of 35 years of work. It was the most exciting thing that I've ever done in my academic career,” Fryer said. Cameron's team sought Fryer’s expertise on the Mariana region as well as her input on the submersible he designed for the dive.

Read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (subscription required). Related articles are linked to in archived news items here and here. Image courtesy of Cindy Ellen Russell/HSA.

Image from PacIOOS data viewer.

May 02: Nearly $2.5 million to support ocean monitoring efforts

Hawai‘i will receive $2,488,545 to support efforts to gather and monitor ocean data and develop appropriate forecasting models Senator Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Representative Mazie K. Hirono, and U.S. Representative Colleen Hanabusa, have announced, in support of the Pacific Integrated Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS), a federal partnership between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the University of Hawai‘i (UH).

For details, please see the full press release.

SOEST logo

May 01: Congratulations!

  • Robert Toonen, Associate Researcher at HIMB, has received the Peter V. Garrod Distinguished Graduate Mentoring Award
  • Scott Rowland, Specialist at the G&G, has received the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Chancellor's Citation for Meritorious Teaching
  • Sarah Crites, HIGP PhD student with planetary scientist Paul Lucey, received the Outstanding Student Paper Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, as just announced by the American Geophysical Union’s Planetary Sciences Section.
  • Arjun Aryal, HIGP PhD student with Ben Brooks (Associate Researcher and Director of the Pacific GPS Facility) is lead author of a paper in the March 2012 issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research—Earth Surface chosen as an Editor’s Highlight.
Photo of black tip shark

Apr 30: Pacific reef shark populations plummeting

Pacific reef shark populations have plummeted by 90 percent or more over the past several decades, according to a new study published online in the journal Conservation Biology, and much of this decline stems from human fishing pressure — both directly targeted for their fins and incidentally caught in nets. “We estimate that reef shark numbers have dropped substantially around populated islands, generally by more than 90% compared to those at the most untouched reefs,” said lead author Marc Nadon from the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR).

Read more about it in CNN, the Washington Post, Scientific American blog, MSNBC, Fox News, and UPI. Photo courtesy of JIMAR.

Photo of Marlin Atkinson

Apr 20: Murky substance fouls stream, Kāne‘ohe Bay

Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) professor Marlin Atkinson didn’t like the murky substance he saw in the Makana Kai Marina. “I am a chemical oceanographer. I live here and I decided to take a look at what’s going on,” said Atkinson. Concerned for the marine environment, he took water samples to try and determine what was dumped into the Kea‘ahala stream, which leads down to the marina. “There’s a lot of tilapia in here and they are out there air-breathing. They don’t like the water. It’s probably low in oxygen. Fresh water is not normally, but this might be,” Atkinson said.

Read more about it and see the video at KITV.com. Image courtesy of KITV.com.

Photo of Ilima Intermediate School

Apr 20: Energy research powers new classroom

A 1,200-square-foot, state-of-the-art structure has been installed at Ilima Intermediate School, testing the effectiveness of an innovative energy efficient building powered by renewable energy. The Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI), is leading the research study to analyze the performance of these energy systems for potential future Navy applications in the Pacific region. The test platform, created by California-based Project Frog, Inc., will be outfitted with high-tech energy monitoring instruments providing valuable research data on the performance of design and material components.

Read more about it in the UH System News and the press release. Image courtesy of P. Thompson, HNEI.

Photo of dolphins by A. Rudd

Apr 12: “Towing My Weight: Partnering with Commercial Shipping for Whale and Dolphin Research”

In a guest blog at Scientific American, Alexis Rudd, a PhD student of Whitlow Au at the Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP), describes her collaboration with Young Brothers Shipping as she records whale and dolphin vocalizations through a hydrophone hanging off the back of a barge towing goods between the Hawaiian Islands.

Read more about it at her blog Sounding the Sea. Photo courtesy of A. Rudd.

Image of student collecting samples

Apr 10: HIMB leads new Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence-Island Earth (COSEE-IE)

Researchers at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) have begun a new program to make scientists and their research more accessible to educators and the community. Since 2002, the National Science Foundation Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Network has grown to 14 thematic and regional centers located around the United States, and the newest addition to the COSEE family has arrived in Hawai‘i: COSEE Island Earth (COSEE-IE).

Read more about it in UH Mānoa news. Photo courtesy J. Lemus.

Photo of Amelia Earhart

Apr 05: UH to collaborate on Earhart expedition

A new clue discovered by the The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) near the island of Nikumaroro in the nation of Kiribati may offer some answers to the mystery of what happened to Amelia Earhart, an American aviator who disappeared with navigator Fred Noonan in the South Pacific on an attempted circumnavigation of the globe. The group plans to launch a 26-day expedition on 02 July 2012 — the 75th anniversary of Earhart’s disappearance — onboard the research vessel Ka‘imikai-o-Kanaloa. “KOK is well suited for [this] type of work,” said Alexander Shor, associate dean for research at SOEST, in an email. “We routinely launch and recover two manned submersibles… and the ship is well outfitted for navigating and communicating with underwater vehicles, which is one of its principal mission requirements.”

Read more about it at Ka Leo and at the TIGHAR Earhart Project page. Image courtesy of Ka Leo.

Photo of octopus

Mar 31: HURL’s deep-sea animal ID image guide is online

The Hawai‘i Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL), the only U.S. deep submergence facility in the Pacific Rim tasked with supporting undersea research necessary to fulfill the mission, goals, and objectives of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), along with other national interests of importance, has created and built up a knowledge base that is featured in a photo-guide of all the organisms one might encounter in the deep-sea around Hawai‘i. Until recently, that guide was only available to scientists preparing for upcoming dives. Now scientists around the world, as well as the general public, can access HURL’s deepwater animal photo-guide online.

Read more about it and see the video at KITV.com; read more about it at UH Mānoa News and Raising Islands. Image courtesy of HURL / SOEST; click on it to go to the original in the database.

Photo of Larsen B ice sheet collapse

Mar 28: UH Mānoa researchers in Antarctica

A multi-institution team of researchers is back in Antarctica studying the consequences of the abrupt collapse of the Larsen B Ice Shelf in the fall of 2002. The UH Mānoa contingent is led by Craig Smith and Laura Grange (click on “Students” then her name).To follow them on this adventure, visit the cruise blog.

Image of DeepSea Challenger submersible

Mar 27: James Cameron’s historic dive cut short by leak

Filmmaker James Cameron’s dive to Challenger Deep, at a depth of almost 11,000 meters, was cut short by equipment problems. Cameron had planned to collect rock and animal samples with the sub’s mechanical arm, but with the hydraulic leak, “I couldn’t pick anything up, so I began to feel like it was a moment of diminishing returns to go on.” HIGP professor Patricia Fryer, whose research involves characterizing the geology of the Mariana Trench region, including seafloor mud volcanoes, is on hand during the sea trials and test dives. She noted that while remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs, are much less expensive than manned subs, “the critical thing is to be able to take the human mind down into that environment…”

See the recent video panel presentation at AGU 2012 (HIGP professor Patty Fryer is at 1:07:45) and an article at CBS News (both added 12-10-12); read more about it in National Geographic, Nature, at KHON2, and Pacific News Center. AP Photo / M. Thiessen / National Geographic.

Photo of Kina, a false killer whale

Mar 23: False killer whale actively focuses echolocation beam

UH Zoology PhD student Laura Kloepper and her advisor Paul Nachtigall, director of the Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB), investigated whether odontocetes — toothed whales and dolphins — are able to actively focus their echolocation “beam” on targets.They worked with Kina (right), an adult female false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens), measuring the size and shape of her beam as it changed depending on the difficulty of the task, with remarkable results. “In previous studies, [Kina]’s managed to distinguish between two objects that differed in width by less than the thickness of a human hair,” says Kloepper. They published the findings in The Journal of Experimental Biology.

Read more about it at BBC Nature (with a short video), National Geographic, and e!Science News; also, listen to an interview with Kloepper on Hawaii Public Radio’s The Conversation (from ~47:15–55:00). Image courtesy of HIMB / SOEST.

Image of DeepSea Challenger submersible

Mar 22: James Cameron heads into the abyss

Filmmaker James Cameron is planning to use a manned sub to dive to Challenger Deep, at a depth of over 10,000 meters, and return with samples and other data. Cameron says, “We want to push the envelope not only of scientific knowledge but also of engineering.” HIGP professor Patricia Fryer, whose research involves characterizing the geology of the Mariana Trench region, including seafloor mud volcanoes, is on hand during the sea trials and test dives, and will provide analysis of samples and data during the main dive. Oceanography professor Jeffrey Drazen, a deep-sea fish biologist who has consulted with Cameron, hopes that the expedition will return with fish from below 4,000 meters — the deepest that he and his colleagues have been able to collect samples from — so that he can analyze the chemical adaptations that allow survival under high pressures.

Read more about it in Nature and National Geographic News. AP Photo / M. Thiessen / National Geographic.

Photo of Mark and Jo Ann Schindler

Mar 13: Mahalo, Mark and Jo Ann Schindler!

UH salutes Mark and Jo Ann Schindler for including SOEST in their Will. These two UH alumni devoted their careers to teaching sciences, library services, and community work for our State. Their bequest will benefit our community by supporting outreach and climate change research for generations to come. Mahalo!

To learn more about supporting UH in this way, please visit www.uhflegacygift.org/

UH Sea Grant logo

Mar 13: Program to award $1 million in grants to Pacific Islands region

Over one million dollars in coastal hazard research grant money is available to coastal communities throughout the Pacific Islands region to help plan for, respond to, and recover from coastal storms. The funding will be distributed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coastal Storms Program (CSP) through the University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program (UH Sea Grant), and is located on the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa campus. The funding will support projects that enhance community resilience to coastal hazards including storms, flooding, sea-level rise, and other climate-associated risks.

Read more about it at Hawaii Reporter. Image courtesy of UH Sea Grant.

grain of Comet 81P/Wild 2

Mar 06: Using a tiny comet grain to date Jupiter’s formation

Using particles from comet 81P/Wild 2 brought to Earth in 2006 by NASA’s Stardust spacecraft, Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) researchers Ryan Ogliore, Gary Huss, and Kazuhide Nagashima, and their colleagues at other institutions have calculated that the planet Jupiter formed more than three million years after the formation of the first solids in our Solar System. The findings suggest the formation of this giant planet affected how materials in the early solar system moved, collided, and coalesced during the complex planet-forming process.

Read more about it at PSR Discoveries, in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (added 03-27-12), Science News, and at TG Daily. You can also download the press release (PDF) or read it at EurekAlert!. Image courtesy of NASA / JPL / Caltech; click on it to learn more.

Image of Pisces V and small fish

Mar 06: Land-ocean connections discovered off Moloka‘i

Scientists from SOEST and colleagues from other institutions recently discovered that land-based plant material and coastal macroalgae indirectly support the increased abundances of bottom fish in submarine canyons, like those off the north shore of the island of Moloka‘i. Oceanography PhD candidate Fabio De Leo, lead author of the report, his PhD advisor Craig Smith, and their colleagues used manned submersibles operated by the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) to perform numerous video transects in two submarine canyons off Moloka‘i at depths ranging from 350 to 1,050 m (~1,000 to ~3,000 ft).

Read more about it in Molokai Dispatch, Science Daily, Science Codex, and Maui Now. You can also download the press release (PDF). Image courtesy of Fabio De Leo/HURL/SOEST; click on it to see the full version.

Photo of Aloha Bowl winners

Mar 05: Congratulations, Maui High School Team B!

On Saturday 03 March 2012, high school students from the state of Hawai‘i and Guam competed in the 10th annual Hawai‘i regional competition for the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), the “Aloha Bowl.” Five high school students from Maui High School Team B won the competition and will represent Hawai‘i in the 15th annual National Ocean Sciences Bowl at the Sheraton Baltimore City Center Hotel on 19–22April 2012 in Baltimore, Maryland.

See the press release PDF and visit the UH Sea Grant page for details. Congratulations to all! Image courtesy UH Sea Grant; click on it to see the full version.

Photo of researchers biopsing a crown-of-thorns sea star

Feb 29: Disproving 30-year hypothesis about sea star invaders

Researchers from the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB), the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR), and Rutgers University have reported that a widely-accepted “secondary outbreak” hypothesis about the cause of outbreaks of destructive crown-of-thorns sea stars does not apply in the central Pacific. Using DNA analysis, they have demonstrated that unlike on the Great Barrier Reef, crown-of-thorns larvae are not moving en masse among central Pacific archipelagos. In fact, outbreaks came from local populations.

Read more about it at UH News, Raising Islands, in the press release, and in the full paper. Image courtesy of D. Smith.

Artist's rendering of WindFloat wind farm

Feb 27: Congratulations!

Former Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) MS student Dominique Roddier's design of a three-legged semisubmersible floating wind turbine, a first by a US company, won Renewable Energy World.com's “Excellence in Renewable Energy Award in Innovation.” See video of the award acceptance and the WindFloat construction, and read about the project.

tsunami debris tracer graphic

Feb 27: UH scientists revise forecast on tsunami debris

International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) ocean scientists originally forecast that debris from the 11 March 2011 tsunami in Japan could reach the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in early 2013. The possibility now exists for an earlier arrival date of this Winter, according to senior researcher Nikolai Maximenko and scientific computer programmer Jan Hafner. The remaining debris is forecast to reach the coasts of Oregon, Washington state, Alaska, and Canada between March 2013 and March 2014.

A video of Nikolai Maximenko speaking, on the first anniversary of the Great Tohoku Earthquake, about the current status of the tsunami debris that the earthquake generated is now available.

Read more about it at the Scientific American, Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Hawaii News Now, the Washington Post, the LA Times, KHON2, Sydney Morning Herald, and the ABC News blog — many with video; a related article in BBC News was released before the 02-28-12 news conference. Image courtesy of Maximenko / Hafner / IPRC; click on it to go to the model page (updated daily).

photo of student using microscope

Feb 24: Middle schools get microscopes from C-MORE

The Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) has distributed digital video microscopes and related supplies to some Hawai‘ Department of Education middle schools statewide. C-MORE hopes this new program will shed light on the hidden world of micro-organisms. “Every drop of sea water contains some of the most important organisms on the planet, and most people probably don’t even realize it,” said marine science educator Jim Foley. Learn more about the “Microscopes in Middle Schools” project here.

Read more about it in West Hawaii Today, Hawaii 24/7, and UH System News. Image courtesy of C-MORE; click on it to visit the “Microscopes in Middle Schools” project page.

Photo of Shinkai 6500 deployment

Feb 22: Clam fields at deep, low-temperature Mariana vents

Located east of Mariana Islands in the western Pacific and at the deepest part of the ocean, the 1,580-mile long Mariana trench is where the Pacific Plate is pushed under the Mariana Plate. A research team, which included HIGP researcher Fernando Martinez, was exploring an area on the inner trench slope of that convergent margin during September 2010. They discovered abundant vesicomyid clam communities associated with a low-temperature hydrothermal vent system, and named the area after the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology manned submersible Shinkai 6500 used in the dives.

Read more about it at UH News. Image courtesy of HIGP / SOEST.

Photo of researcher and penguins

Feb 22: Life on Ice: Living and working in Antarctica

In collaboration with a consortium of scientists studying everything from penguins to krill to microbes, researchers from the Grieg Steward Laboratory spent the austral summer at Palmer Station on the West Antarctic Peninsula (WPA) investigating the mortality of phytoplankton due to viruses. Assistant researcher Alex Culley, studying the role of marine viruses in the polar ecosystem, is one of the scientists mentioned in a recent Popular Mechanics article that gives a taste of the unique flavor of conducting research on ice.

Read more about it at Popular Mechanics. Image courtesy of Jennifer Bogo.

Photo of researchers biopsing a crown-of-thornssea star

Feb 21: Field Geology of the Big Island: Lake Waiau

In this video, Windward Community College (WCC) professor of Geology and SOEST G&G cooperating graduate faculty member Floyd McCoy discusses Lake Waiau (13,020 ft), near the summit of Mauna Kea on the Island of Hawai‘i. (Produced by Bonnie Beatson and Peter Tully Owen. All rights reserved.)

photo of Kane'ohe

Feb 15: Energy from Hawai‘i’s waves

Wave power is the alternative energy source in Hawai‘i that is the least developed but has the most potential, according to a recent federal study. The most successful wave energy project in Hawai‘i to date was done by Ocean Power Technologies, a New Jersey-based company that began testing power-generating buoys in Kāne‘ohe Bay in 2004. That work was invaluable in terms of the information it produced for the nascent wave power industry, said Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) specialist Luis Vega, manager of the Hawai‘i National Marine Renewable Energy Center (HINMREC).

Read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin (subscription) and Power Engineering. Image courtesy of HINMREC; click on it to learn more.

Photo of sediment trap

Feb 12: HOT news: Pacific carbon pump speeds up in summer

Using 13 years of Hawai‘i Ocean Time-series (HOT) data from Station ALOHA (about 100 miles north of O‘ahu), an international team of scientists led by David Karl, professor of Oceanography and director of C-MORE, has documented a regular, significant, and unexpected increase in the amount of particulate matter exported to the deep sea in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. The findings were published in the 07 February 2012 issue of PNAS, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Oceanography assistant professor Matthew Church is a co-author.

Read more about it at UH News, which includes a profile of Dr Karl. Also, see the profile of Dr Karl at PNAS (subscription only). Image courtesy of Adriana Harlan and Susan Curless / SOEST.

photo of wooded drifter

Jan 27: Tracking the great Japan tsunami debris field

In order to better understand the flow of marine debris from the Japan tsunami last year, a team of researchers including Nikolai Maximenko and Jan Hafner of IPRC is using a combination of high and low technology tracking devices. They have deposited a series of buoys, which report their position by satellite, and hundreds of simple wooden blocks near the leading edge of the debris field. The blocks are imprinted with an email address and phone number so beachcombers, boaters, and anyone else who finds one can report when and where they located it.

Read more about it at Raising Islands, and download the IPRC press release (PDF). Image courtesy of IPRC; click on it to see the full image.

photo of tropical fish and reef

Jan 24: Ocean acidity worsening, study finds

International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) postdoctoral fellow Tobias Friedrich is lead author of a paper in the online issue of Nature Climate Change examining the effects of man-made CO2 emissions on ocean water acidity (as acidity increases, the rates animals such as coral and shrimp make the calcium carbonate they use in their skeletons and shells decreases). In some regions, acidity levels appear to have risen faster in the last 200 years than in the previous 21,000 years. “Our results suggest that severe reductions are likely to occur in coral reef diversity, structural complexity and resilience by the middle of this century,” says co-author Axel Timmermann, a professor in the department of Oceanography.

Read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, The Daily Mail, Green House, Hawaii Reporter, and EurekaAlert!. An animation showing changes in surface saturation levels of aragonite (a form of calcium carbonate) between 1800 and 2100 is available on YouTube. Image courtesy Dwayne Meadows, NOAA.

Photo of beach erosion

Jan 20: Waikīkī Sand

Coastal geologist Chip Fletcher, SOEST's Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, is interviewed on ‘Ōiwi TV, Hawaiian Language Television, about Waikīkī beach replenishment and the importance of long-term planning to protect Hawai‘i’s culturally, ecologically, and economically important beaches. The state is taking sand from sand fields 2500 ft. off shore to replace sand lost from the Duke Kahanamoku statue to the Royal Hawaiian Hotel. “Because we’ve engineered and altered the shoreline so dramatically over the last century, we are trying to reestablish a natural process that has been lost,” he said.

Read more about it and see the video at ‘Ōiwi TV. Image courtesy of SOEST / Coastal Geology Group.

Photo of Japan tsumani debris field near Midway

Jan 20: Tsunami debris exploration: new theories, questions

International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) senior researcher Nikolai Maximenko is analyzing debris collected on a month-long expedition from Honolulu to Midway Islands, as well as debris recently washed ashore on Moloka‘i. Maximenko believes none of it is from Japan's disaster, but is instead from the massive North Pacific “garbage patch.” The material is old and includes plastic objects used in Canada and the US, as well as Asia. Also, he said, the debris from Japan has “…stopped, because of a temperature front on the southern edge of the debris.” However, light windblown debris has already reached the US West Coast.

Read more about it and see the video at KITV4. See related coverage in SOEST’s news archives here and here. Image courtesy of KITV and SOEST / IPRC.

photo of C-MORE Hale

Jan 17: C-MORE Hale earns LEED Platinum certification

C-MORE Hale, headquarters of the Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE), has been awarded the highest level of certification established by the US Green Building Council (USGBC) and verified by the Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI): LEED Platinum for energy use, lighting, water and material use, and for incorporating a variety of other sustainable strategies. It becomes the first research laboratory building in Hawai‘i, and only the eighth construction project in the state, to receive the highest level of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification.

Read more about it at News at UH, EarthTechling, and Mānoa Campus Talk (all three added 01-30-12), World Interior Design Network (added 01-27-12), and The Republic; read the press release at the UH Newsroom. Image courtesy Craig Hakoda.

Photo of great white shark

Jan 17: Shark expert confirms great white in Hawaiian waters

Fisherman Addison Toki recently took video of a shark he identified as a great white circling a fishing boat several miles off O‘ahu’s Waianae Coast. Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) researcher Kim Holland, director of the Shark Research Group, took one look at the video and confirmed that the animal is in fact a great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). As many as ten individual sharks tagged with electronic devices off California and Mexico have made the trip to Hawaiian waters, he noted, but why they make the trip is still a mystery.

Read more about it and see the video at Hawaii News Now. Image courtesy of Hawaii News Now.

photo of R/V Kilo Moana

Jan 07: R/V Kilo Moana returns safely after taking on water

After receiving assistance from the US Coast Guard on Friday, the Kilo Moana has returned to Honolulu a day after taking on water from a baseball-sized hole. The hole appeared behind pipes in the starboard hull and was difficult to reach, said Brian Taylor, Dean of SOEST. “It’s very well run and a very reliable research vessel. It’s not prone to baseball size holes in its side for sure. We’re as puzzled as anyone,” said Sandy Shor, SOEST’s Associate Dean for Research. The 186" twin-hull research vessel was in the open ocean about 70 miles north of O‘ahu on a five-day expedition to Station ALOHA. Onboard were about 20 researchers in two teams from UH and the University of Washington, and 20 crew members; no one was hurt.

Read more about it and see the video at KHON2 and Hawaii News Now; read more about it in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser (subscription) here and here, and in the Washington Post. Image courtesy of SOEST.

photo of sick coral

Jan 04: Coral disease affecting reef in Kāne‘ohe Bay

The disease called acute “Montipora White Syndrome” (MWS) has reappeared and is again killing corals in Kāne‘ohe Bay, O‘ahu. The current outbreak has already affected 198 colonies of rice coral (Montipora capitata). A rapid response team led by Greta Aeby, assistant researcher at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB), has been activated to document the outbreak. Members of the investigative team include scientists from the UH, HIMB, and USGS National Wildlife Health Center.

Read more about it and see the video at KHON2; read more about it in the Hawaii Reporter, RedOrbit, Kansas City News “infoZine” (added 01-23-12), and in the press release PDF. Image courtesy of G. Aeby / HIMB.

[ Top of this page. ]

 

Jump to: January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December

SOEST News | Go to archives for: 2014201320122011201020092008200720062005200420032002
SOEST Bulletin • Press releases: 20142012201220112010200920082007200620052004 and earlier
If you have news to share, or would like more information about any of the above, please contact:

Mahalo! (Thank you!)