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03.02.11: Wave amplitude versus friction coefficient in the upper and middle layersΒΆ

Fig. 1 shows the evolution of the wave amplitude versus the Laplacian friction coefficient K in the upper and middle layers for the two series of numerical experiments. In all cases, the wave amplitude decays with the increasing K. What do we learn from this?

../../../../../_images/amp_v_upper_middle_two_series.png

Figure 1: Squared wave amplitude versus the Laplacian friction coefficient in the upper and middle layers for two series of numerical experiments. The amplitude is defined here as the maximum over a wave cycle of the meridional velocity near the center of the domain.

From Eric:

It looks like the Laplacian friction is the primary damping in both layers, and for the system as a whole. In other words, not much energy is making it to the bottom layer. Presumably doubling or halving the bottom friction coefficient would not have much effect. The “wave amplitude” is directly forced in the upper layer, and decaying with depth, perhaps more because it doesn’t match a baroclinic mode than because it is damped in the bottom layer. In other words, the behavior is evanescent rather than propagating in the vertical.


computed with plot_wave_amplitude_mean_quantities.m in RESEARCH/MODELISATION/HIM/studies/PV_and_dissipation/forced_damped_wave/exp15.